22 March 20 | Daily challenge

Writing challenge

Amplify

Randomly choose three successive sentences in any book. Or use the sentences in “Example” (below).

Add a sentence between each of them. You now have five sentences.

Between each of those, add one more sentence. You now have nine sentences.

Include at least one of the following: Dialogue. A switch between tenses (past, present or future).

Post your version in the comments below! Thank you.


Example

How is that minuteness demonstrated? Michael W stuck the silicon on a girl’s front tooth and asked her to say cheese. The close-up of a smiling mouth with a tiny blemish told the story.

– from Pictures On A Page, Harold Evans

Stage one (add two more sentences, and changed tense): How is that minuteness demonstrated? How will it be demonstrated in days to come? Michael W stuck the silicon on a girl’s front tooth and asked her to say cheese. Each time she opened her mouth, the silicon chip fell off, leaving a residue of glue. The close-up of a smiling mouth with a tiny blemish told the story.

Stage two (add four more sentences, and dialogue): How is that minuteness demonstrated? With a magnifying glass. How will it be demonstrated in days to come? By means of charts and graphs. Michael W stuck the silicon on a girl’s front tooth and asked her to say cheese. He was a circus acrobat at the time, living in Islington. Each time she opened her mouth, the silicon chip fell off, leaving a residue of glue. “You stupid girl,” he raved, blaming her for his own mistake. The close-up of a smiling mouth with a tiny blemish told the story.

Note

This seems like a very silly and pointless exercise, but it’s a wonderful way to practice giving more space to your own narrative. To show, not tell. To let stories breathe.